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Enabling better global research outcomes in soil, plant & environmental monitoring.

SKU 421 UVA Sensor

Skye offer sensors to measure light levels in the Ultraviolet A and Ultraviolet B wavebands. The wavelengths used in this UVA sensor is according to CIE standards.

The dimensions and overall look of these sensors is similar to that of other Skye sensors. The housing is black aluminium, sealed to IP67 standards, suitable for short term underwater use. Skye guarantees sensors to a depth of 4 meters for short term immersion. The light collecting head utilises a UV stable polymer and is cosine corrected. The sensors have been designed with an integral amplifier to give a voltage output for use with most dataloggers, computers, PLCs, etc. Sensors calibration is traceable to NPL and each sensor is issued with a calibration certificate.

Construction: Anodised black aluminium, sealed to IP67, submersible to 4m.
Short term submersions only. Please contact for greater depths.
Cable Screened 7-1-4-C military specification. Cable gland on sensor housing
Sensor Cosine corrected head. Specially formulated diffuser.
Detector GaAsP photodiode
Filters Optical Glass
Spectral Response
(FWHM or 50% transmission)
315nm-400nm
Working Range 0-100 W/m2
Output Signal 0-2 V
Sensitivity 10mV / W/m2
Thermal Drift of Output
(-20 to 50°C)
0.025 mV/°C max
Thermal Drift of Zero Offset
(-20 to 50°C)
Typically 0.01 mV/°C
Output Impedance 500W
Power Supply 5-15 V DC
Absolute Calibration Error Typically < 3%, 5% max
Cosine Error 3%
Azimuth Error
(45° elevation over 360°)
< 1%
Longterm Stability ± 2%
Response Time < 10ms
Weight 200g (with 3m cable)
Temperature Range -30 to 60°C
Mounting M6 x 7mm tapped hole in base. Sensor supplied with M6 x 16mm screw + four 15mm washers to suit panel thickness of 3-10mm

SKU421 UVA

SKU421 Relative Spectral Response

Ultraviolet Light

Ultraviolet Light (UV) that comes from the sun can be classified into three categories – UV-C (100-280nm), UV-B (280-315nm) and UV-A (315-400nm). Up to 99% of solar UV radiation is blocked by the Earth’s atmosphere, the remaining being mostly in the UV-A spectrum, and UV-C is blocked completely.

The shorter the wavelength, the more energy is carried. As such, UV-B/C are much more harmful to skin than UV-A, causing sunburn, melanoma and cancer. Although, recent research suggests that UV-A can cause cancer by indirect DNA degradation. This also leads to degradation of polymers, and some pigments and dyes.