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Enabling better global research outcomes in soil, plant & environmental monitoring.

Scholander PWSC for Round Stems

The Model 3000 Scholander Plant Water Status Console, also known as the pressure bomb, has been the standard of excellence in plant water status research for over 2 decades. This work horse has all the features needed to make extensive readings in record time. Supplied without a bottled gas tank and regulator it is designed for use within the lab where a large air supply tank or mains air supply is available.

The 3000 Series Plant Water Status Console provides a means of quickly and accurately measuring the water status of plant leaves. A leaf or small branch is placed in the sample chamber with the cut end protruding from the specimen holder. Pressure is built up inside the chamber until the pressure exceeds the tension inside the plant material, and xylem sap begins to flow from the cut end. The tension can then be read directly from the pressure gauge. The model 3000 must be connected to an external source such as a compressed gas cylinder. Sample chambers are available in several different lengths, ranging from 18 cm to 51 cm. Two operating pressure ranges, 0 to 40 bars and 0 to 80 bars, are available. Two specimen holders are available, one for use with round-stem materials, and one for blade-type plant materials. A number of differently sized and shaped sealing sleeves and grommets assure that the plant material of interest is safely sealed in the specimen holder, allowing measurements to be made.

3000  Plant Water Status Console, without air supply. Must include 1 each of options A, B, C, and D (see image above). The most common configuration, 3000-1412, has a 18cm high Pressure Vessel, 3015G4 Specimen Holder, 0 to 40 bar range, and set of 20cm legs.

  • 22 cubic foot aluminium DOT-3AL aluminium cylinder with CGA-580 fitting rated for 2216 psi – requires hydrostatic testing every 5 years.
  • Single stage, step-down regulator set to 600 psi at the factory (can be reset by user if necessary).
  • Standard pressure vessel 18cm, 0.5 litre volume, 2.4 kg, 40 or 80 bars. Cam lock. Specimen holder with safety valve. Internal diameter 6.9cm with vertical usable height 14.8cm.
    • 30.4cm and 50.8cm vessels also available. 30.4cm, 3.8 kg, 1 litre volume, 27.5cm height. 50.8cm, 6.3 kg, 1.8 litre, 50.3cm height.
    • All vessels 6.9cm diameter and rated for 80 bars with cam lock and safety valve features. Made of stainless steel for a lifetime of use.
  • 15.2cm scientific test gauge with beryllium copper movement and stainless steel case, 0.25 of 1% full scale accuracy and the highest quality you can buy for many years of service.
  • 600 psi gauge, 40 bars. Subdivisions 2 psi, 0.2Bars, 20 kPa and
  • 1500 psi gauge, 80 bars. Subdivisions 10 psi, 0.5 Bars, 50 kPa.
    • Resolution half a division. Dual scale psi + kPa, Parallax mirror and adjustable needle to re-zero if necessary.

A solid polyethylene sample preparation board is mounted to the heavy-duty aluminum chassis. Sample chambers are available in several different lengths, ranging from 18 cm to 51 cm). Two operating pressure ranges, 0 to 40 bars and 0 to 80 bars, are available. Two specimen holders are available, one for use with round-stem materials, and one for blade-type plant materials. A number of differently sized and shaped sealing sleeves and grommets assure that the plant material of interest is safely sealed in the specimen holder, allowing measurements to be made.

The unique modular leg design vastly increases the versatility of the plant status console, changing from 20cm feet to 81cm feet is a snap. The monolithic design of the chassis increases strength while reducing weight. Now with locking castors, the unit can be effortlessly transported through the lab.

Carroll, A.B., Pallardy, S.G. and Galen, C. (2001), Drought Stress, Plant Water Status, and Floral Trait Expression on Fireweed, Epilobium Angustifolium (Onagraceae), American Journal of Botany, vol. 88, no. 3, pp. 438-446.

Dichio, B., Xiloyannis, C., Sofo, A. and Montanaro, G. (2005), Osmotic Regulation in Leaves and Roots of Olive Trees During a Water Deficit and Rewatering, Tree Physiology, vol. 26, pp. 179-185.

Fernández, J.E., Díaz- Espejo, A., Infante, J.M., Durán, P.J., Palomo, M.J., Chamorro, V., Girón, I.F. and Villagarcía, L. (2006), Water Relations and Gas Exchange in Olive Trees under Regulated Deficit Irrigation and Partial Rootzone Drying, Plant and Soil, vol. 284, pp. 273-291.

Girona, J., Mata, M., del Campo, J., Arbones, A., Bartra, E. and Marsal, J. (2006), The Use of Midday Leaf Water Potential for Scheduling Deficit Irrigation in Vineyards, Irrigation Science, vol. 24, pp. 115-127.

Guerrero, J., Moriana, A., Pérez-López, D., Couceiro, J.F., Olmedilla, N. and Gijón, M.C. (2006), Regulated Deficit Irrigation and the Recovery of Water Relations in Pistachio Trees, Tree Physiology, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 87-92.

Hubbert, K.R., Beyers, J.L. and Graham, R.C. (2001), Roles of Weathered Bedrock and Soil in Seasonal Water Relations of Pinus Jeffreyi and Arctostaphylos patula, Canadian Journal of Forest Research, vol. 31, pp. 1947-1957.

McClenahan, K., Macinnis-Ng, C. and Eamus, D. (2004), Hydraulic Architecture and Water Relations of Several Species at Diverse Sites around Sydney, Australian Journal of Botany, vol. 52, pp. 509-518.

O’Grady, A.P., Eamus, D., Cook, P.G. and Lamontagne, S. (2005), Comparative Water Use by the Riparian Trees Melaleuca argentea and Corymbia bella in the Wet-dry Tropics of Northern Australia, Tree Physiology, vol. 26, pp. 219-228.

O’Leary, S.J.B. and von Aderkas, P. (2006), Postpollination Drop Production in Hybrid Larch is not Related to the Diurnal Pattern of Xylem Water Potential, Trees, vol. 20, pp. 61-66.

Thompson, R.B., Gallardo, M., Valdez, L.C. and Fernández, M.D. (2007), Using Plant Water Status to Define Threshold Values for Irrigation Management of Vegetable Crops using Soil Moisture Sensors, Agricultural Water Management, vol. 88, pp. 147-158.

Trifilò, P., Raimondo, F., Nardini, A., Lo Gullo, M.A. and Salleo, S. (2004), Drought Resistance of Ailanthus altissima: Root Hydraulics and Water Relations, Tree Physiology, vol. 24, pp. 107-114.

Van Leeuwen, C., Tregoat, O., Chone, X., Bois, B., Pernet, D., & Gaudillere, J. P. (2009). Vine Water Status is a Key Factor in Grape Ripening and Vintage Quality for Red Bordeaux Wine. How can it be assessed for vineyard management purposes? Journal of International Science Vigne Vin, 121-134. PDF

Van Leeuwen, C., Tregoat, O., Chone, X., Gaudillere, J. P., & Pernet, D. (2008). Different environmental conditions, different results: the role of controlled environmental stress on grape quality potential and the way to monitor it. Proceedings of the 13th Australian Wine Industry Technical Conference, 39-46. PDF