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Enabling better global research outcomes in soil, plant & environmental monitoring.

Sap Flow in Tall Trees

Measuring Sapflow in the Worlds Tallest Trees

Dr Stephen C. Sillett (of Humboldt State University, California) studies the ecology of tall trees and the forests they create and has studied the ecology of Coastal Redwoods. Coastal Redwood is an important ecological and economic resource; the timber has good decay, insect and fire resistance.

Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), also called coast redwood and California redwood, is native to the central and northern California coast, a region of moderate to heavy winter rain and summer fog so vital to this tree. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeast Area.
Goal
The aim was to gather sapflow and environmental meteorological data from Sequoia sempervirens specimens to study biophysical limits to tree height. The method involved installing data logging field stations in 15 specimens of Sequoia sempervirens. Sensor clusters were placed at 3 heights on each tree: near the crown, bottom of crown and at the base of the tree.

Results
Sapflow from November through February: Up to 1069 liters H2O transpired per day and up to 297 liters H2O absorbed by leaves per day

Observations
During periods of rain, a negative sapflow was observed.

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